Frequently Asked Questions


Content and General Questions


1)  What is the Financial Times Historical Archive?
2)  What is Gale?
3)  What is included in the Archive?
4)  Will the content be extended?
5)  Was the Financial Times ever known by any other title?
6)  Does the Archive incorporate any other titles?
7)  When and why did the newspaper become pink?
8)  Why are the pages and articles not pink?
9)  Why is there no content for Sundays?
10)  Are there any missing issues?
11)  Is the Financial Times connected to The Times (of London)?
12)  Who reads the Financial Times Newspaper?
13)  Where has the content been sourced?
14)  How has the database been created?
15)  Are there any other companion products available?
16)  Does the Financial Times Historical Archive support custom branding?

Technical/Searching Information


1)  What is Optical Character Recognition technology?
2)  What does a Keyword search cover?
3)  What does an Advanced search cover?
4)  What does 'fuzzy search' mean and what are the different levels?
5)  How does the browse function work?
6)  How long will I have access to this database?
7)  Is it possible to print from this database?
8)  Is it possible to save an article for future reference?
9)  How do I use the Gale User Account and what are its benefits?
10)  Can I save searches to my Gale User Account?
11) How do I save marked items to my Gale User Account?
 

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Content and General Questions


1)  What is the Financial Times Historical Archive?
The complete searchable facsimile run of the world’s most authoritative daily business newspaper, from 1888 to 2010. From its foundation, the Financial Times recognised that global financial and economic issues were to increasingly become the predominant forces of the twentieth century. This historical archive of the Financial Times is a comprehensive, accurate and unbiased research tool for everyone studying the economic and business history and current affairs of the last 121 years.

This online fully searchable facsimile edition of the Financial Times offers the complete run of the London edition of the paper, from its first issue to the end of 2010. Every individual article, advertisement and market listing is included and shown individually and in the context of the full page and issue of the day. For this online archive every item has been Subject or Topic categorised to permit fast retrieval and review of relevant articles.

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2)  Who is Gale?
Gale, part of Cengage Learning, is the largest publisher of reference, journal and primary source databases for the library and academic community. Other Gale Digital Collections include the Eighteenth Century Collections Online, The Times Digital Archive and The Making of the Modern World. In total, nearly 100 million pages of archival primary source documents, newspapers, books and manuscripts are available through Gale’s collections.

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3)  What is included in the Archive?
Daily editions from 1888–2010, although please note there are no Sunday editions.

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4)  Will the content be extended?
No. The archive covers the period from 1888 to 2010 and no new content is being added.

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5)  Was the Financial Times ever known by any other title?
From Jan. 18, 1888 until Feb. 13, 1888 the Financial Times was called the London Financial Guide.

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6)  Does the Archive incorporate any other titles?
In 1945, the Financial Times merged with its rival the Financial News. However the Financial Times archive does not currently contain the back issues of the Financial News.

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7)  When and why did the newspaper become pink?
In 1893, the Financial Times was first printed on salmon pink paper to distinguish it from the Financial News, which at the time was its main rival.

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8)  Why are the pages and articles not pink?
The archive has been created from microfilm copies, which are in black and white. We have endeavoured to compensate by incorporating the distinctive colours of the Financial Times in the design of the site.

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9)  Why is there no content for Sundays?
The Financial Times does not publish on Sundays.

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10)  Are there any missing issues?
Although everything has been done to make sure the content is as complete as possible, occasionally missing pages are discovered and wherever possible they are re-sourced and included in updates.

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11)  Is the Financial Times connected to The Times (of London)?
No. Although they share a common word in the title, they are owned by completely separate publishers.

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12)  Who reads the Financial Times Newspaper?
1.3 million people worldwide read the Financial Times in print and online[1] FT.com attracts 11.4 million unique users, generating 82.2 million page views and now has over 1.2 million registered users.[2]

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13)  Where has the content been sourced?
Digitized scans have been taken from our microfilm copies of the Financial Times newspaper.

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14)  How has the database been created?
By taking our entire microfilm collection of the Financial Times (London) and turning it into a high-resolution digital format with extensive clean-up to ensure the clearest images. Images have then been electronically clipped and individual articles identified. The clipped images have been OCR’d which provides the data used for full text, field and section searching. The data has been subsequently reviewed for accuracy and hit-term highlighting within the pages is supported. Finally, data has been loaded into the system allowing users to search, browse and view the facsimile images based on their search terms.

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15)  Are there any other companion products available?
Yes, in particular the Economist Historical Archive and The Times Digital Archive.

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16)  Does the Financial Times Historical Archive support custom branding?
No.

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Technology and Searching


1)  What is Optical Character Recognition technology?
Optical character recognition (OCR) is the process of converting an image of text, such as a scanned page from a book, into an electronic, computer-editable text. The text in an image is not editable or searchable: the letters are made of tiny dots (pixels) that together form a picture of text. During OCR, computer software analyzes an image and uses the patterns in the pixels to convert the pictures of the characters to editable and searchable text file. The full text of every page of the Financial Times Historical Archive has been captured in this digital format, allowing the user cover-to-cover full-text searching of all pages within the database.

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2)  What does a Keyword search cover?
The homepage search offers two search options: Keyword and Entire Document. The Keyword option searches these key fields for your search term(s): main article title, article subtitles and authors. Selecting the Entire Document option searches the full text of all articles. A Keyword option is a good all-purpose search. Use Entire Document if Keyword isn't producing the results you want or if you are searching for a specific line of text or jargon.

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3)  What does an Advanced search cover?
The Advanced search enables more specific searching and has been devised specifically for the Financial Times Historical Archive. There are 8 index fields including title, entire document and author and 46 limiters including date, 8 sections and 38 sub-sections. Boolean searching is supported to combine/ exclude search terms.

Boolean Search Operators, Search Proximity Operators and Wildcards are all supported.

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4)  What does 'fuzzy search' mean and what are the different levels?
Fuzzy search settings can enhance a full-text search by retrieving near matches on a term or terms. It allows a user to locate a word or words within documents despite imperfect matches in spelling between the searched term and document content.  This can be a common occurrence due to spelling variants or OCR errors.

Three levels of fuzzy searching are offered so that the user may fine-tune a search — depending on how closely he/she wants to match term(s): Low, Medium, and High. The Low setting will expand the full-text search results to include very near matches on the chosen term(s) (e.g., a full-text search on “harbor” with fuzzy search set at Low will return results containing both "harbor" and "harbour").  The High setting will expand the results to include very broad matches on the chosen term(s) (e.g., a full-text search on "harbor" with fuzzy search set at High will return results containing "harbor", "harbour", "Harper", and "Harben").

Note that while a fuzzy search will find additional matches for the word/term being searched, it will also return numerous false returns so it should be used in moderation.

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5)  How does the browse function work?
Enter or select a date and see a taster image of the front cover of that edition. Select the image or date and results with an image of each page of that day’s edition displays. This is very useful if you want to find what happened on a particular day.

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6)  How long will I have access to this database?
This database is licensed to institutional libraries around the world. As long as you have access rights to a licensed institution — typically a university or college library — you will be able to use the database.

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7)  Is it possible to print from this database?
Yes, the user can print either the full page or an article. For full-page printing, the system will use PDF files and Adobe Acrobat.

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8)  Is it possible to save an article for future reference?
You can use the mark feature to mark articles or pages of particular interest. You can also email and bookmark articles and pages. You can also use the Gale User Account to save searches, marked items — articles and pages. For information about the Gale User Account see the next questions.

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9)  How do I use the Gale User Account and what are its benefits?
Register your details to set up an individual Gale User Account. You can then log in at any time. The My Account Page (also known as the Dashboard) lets you view and manage your Gale User Account activity. In the main part of the screen, you will find up to four saved entries displayed in each of the boxes listed below. The entries listed within each box are active links; in addition, you'll find a More link indicating how many more entries you have in that category. An advantage of the Gale User Account is that all the products that have this functionality will all save to this account so you can access any saved items to any database from this here.

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10)  Can I save searches to my Gale User Account?
With a Gale User Account, you can save and organize your searches to your Gale User Account and then re-run them later.

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11)  How do I save marked items to my Gale User Account?
Once you are logged into your Gale User Account, you can display items you have marked during your current session but have not yet moved to a folder by clicking the Marked Items link on the search type bar. As a registered Gale user, the Marked Items Page will let you sort your items and create custom folders in which to permanently save your marked items.

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