Picture Post's stable of photographers reads like a role call of the finest and most influential figures of 20th century photojournalism. Producing some of the most iconic images of the 20th century, these photographers have been the sources of inspiration and instruction for generations of students of journalism and photography and include:


Bill Brandt

Bill Brandt is widely considered to be one of the most important British photographers of the 20th century, documenting all levels of British society. In the late 1930s, working as a photojournalist for Picture Post, Brandt  photographed the industrial cities and coal-mining districts of northern England, creating images that reveal the plight of England’s industrial workers during the 1930s. When WW II began, Brandt became a staff photographer for the British Home Office, capturing Londoners crowded into air-raid shelters in the city’s underground train stations. After the war Brandt photographed a series of landscapes associated with English literature, published as Literary Britain (1951). His work in the 1950s became increasingly expressionistic, culminating in his best-known collection, Perspective of Nudes (1961).

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John Chillingworth

John Chillingworth, who joined Picture Post in 1943 ``to make the tea'' for the darkroom staff, rejoined the magazine as a photographer in 1950 after National Service. Over the next six years he was to create a greater number of memorable, sensitive images. Noted for his moving series of picture essays of children in post-war Korea and Japan, Chillingworth was also an accomplished all-rounder whose next assignment was the Paris fashion shows. 

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Bert Hardy

Staff Photographer for The Picture Post between 1941-57. His pictures of the Blitz were among the finest taken by any cameraman. Hardy was with Allied troops that took part in the D-Day  landings in June 1944, also photographing the liberation of Paris on 25th August. He followed the troops into Germany and took photographs of the Bergen-Belsen concentration. Back in Britain after the war he moved into photographing the social scene, particularly life from the underside. His pictures in the Gorbals, Glasgow's notorious slum, and the Elephant and Castle in London, before its demolition, have become classics.

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Thurston Hopkins

Thurston Hopkins photographed a variety of subjects, produced in response to the needs of various editors. His typical subjects are people caught in their typical social environment - the old woman in the Liverpool slums, a vicar amongst his parishioners and party-goers in Highgate, London. 

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Kurt Hutton

Kurt Hutton (originally Hubschmann) was one of several Germans working at Picture Post. He helped introduce the Leica to Britain, shooting some of the most enduring images of the era on a camera derided by many of his peers. One of Hutton's most famous shots is of a rollercoaster ride at Southend fair (1938), originally printed with the caption "Crisis forgotten. War scares blown away. 

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Felix Man

One of the pioneers of modern photojournalism, Felix Man contributed more than half the photographs in the first issue of Picture Post. Man's subject matter was never confined to the documentary - his interests ranged from portraiture to fashion to the theatre. His photographs of artists in their studios - Braque, Hockney, Matisse - are considered to be among his finest. One of his most famous photographs is of Mussolini in the vast auditorium he used as an office.

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Grace Robertson

As a woman, Robertson had access to many subjects closed to a man. She was able to photograph women helping one another to wash at a Turkish bath in 1951. In 1955 she invited herself along to snap girls getting ready for a party and was present as a woman gave birth.  One of her most iconic photos is of two women laughing as they try to hold their skirts down on a rollercoaster, deliberately echoing a picture taken 18 years earlier by a fellow Picture Post photographer, Kurt Hutton. In 1954 she married Thurston Hopkins, a fellow Picture Post photographer.

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Humphrey Spender

Working for the Picture Post, and, in the late 1930's, for Mass Observation, an anthropological survey of British culture and class, Spender roamed down-and-out English towns like Bolton and Blackpool. Shooting in black and white, his Leica camera often concealed beneath his coat, he photographed people as they went about their daily business: on buses and in the street, at home and at work, at the markets and in the pubs. He shot christenings and funerals, men in the mines, women hanging out washing, the empty cobbled streets of new housing developments, and his photographs of chalked graffiti captured British humor. Spender offered a glimpse into a world that for upper-class Britons was largely unknown, if not outright taboo. Spender is considered to be one of Britain's great black-and-white social documentarians.

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